Dinesh D’Souza: Bundy Ranchers Are Facing Real Domestic Terror
From Their Own Government (Video)



Watch What Warren Buffett Does, Not What He Says

11/27/2012

 

 Weekly Standard:

Warren Buffett is by now no stranger to the national debate over federal tax policy. In 2009, he penned a New York Times op-ed calling for “truly major changes in both taxes and outlays.” Two years later, he returned to the Times with a widely publicized call for large tax increases on the “super-rich,” noting that his own effective federal tax rate (17 percent) was far less than his employees’ rates (ranging from 33 to 41 percent). President Obama liked the idea so much, he called for Congress to pass “the Buffett Rule” in his 2012 state of the union address.

Given that long, well-publicized history, there isn’t much news to be found in Buffett’s latest Times op-ed this morning, calling once again for a minimum tax on millionaires. Except that Buffett opens this one with a rifle shot at Grover Norquist specifically, and supply-side economics generally:

Suppose that an investor you admire and trust comes to you with an investment idea. “This is a good one,” he says enthusiastically. “I’m in it, and I think you should be, too.”

Would your reply possibly be this? “Well, it all depends on what my tax rate will be on the gain you’re saying we’re going to make. If the taxes are too high, I would rather leave the money in my savings account, earning a quarter of 1 percent.” Only in Grover Norquist’s imagination does such a response exist.

It’s a catchy opener, attracting headlines and guffaws from the expected quarters. But I’m struck by his opener because I can think of at least one real-world example in which a rich investor nearly spiked a deal due to taxes: Warren Buffett himself, as recounted in Alice Schroeder’s terrific biography, The Snowball (pages 230-232).

Early in his career, Buffett invested heavily—almost one third of his early fund’s capital—in Sanborn Map, a company that mapped utility lines and such. But he soon grew frustrated with the company’s leadership, which “operated more like a club than a business,” and which refused to return greater dividends to investors. So Buffett amassed more and more stock, and with control of the company finally in hand he pressed the board of directors to split the company in two (one for the mapping business, and one to hold the company’s other outsized investments). READ MORE

Leave a Comment

Current day month ye@r *

Previous post:

Next post: